From the Downhill Slope

FACING THE INEVITABLE BEST DONE EARLY

I consider one of the blessings of my life to be working on a cancer service in my early twenties.  I became intimately acquainted with death, not the romantic deaths portrayed in the media, but the true horrors that were so often a part of dying.

Going Gentle Into That Good Night Goes Awry: The Graphic Memoir ‘Special Exits’ : Monkey See : NPR.

The earlier we give up some romantic fantasies, the stronger we are emotionally.  I have lived my life knowing I would die, hoping I would regret little and that it would be in my power to die with some grace, but most importantly, not to have my death prolonged.  I have written my so called living will, told my children when to pull the plug and hopefully spared them much angst about what I would want.  I am  hoping they will read Farmer’s book, but suspect not.  Will you?

Doing so is not easy, but as the existentialists point out, it does sharpen the ability to enjoy the now and keep one focuses on what matters.  I am not suggesting dwelling morbidly on the inevitable, but also not denying it.

I am also  suggesting that  knowing  death can come suddenly, you give up grudges that keep you from talking to  those you love.    Death of a loved one almost always brings guilt or regret, but knowing it might swoop down and take one you love, helps you remember what matters, so you constantly practice kindness and forgiveness,  It is the only way to assure the important relationships in your life live as long as you do.

Agree or disagree, comments are always welcomed.

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