When A Goal Is Not Met, The Wrong Goal Was Set

The SMART goal series continues. I didn’t make last week’s goal. Sigh. You need to measure your progress and motivation weekly to succeed.

Poster Coach used in setting #SMART goals

My motivation remains at a four, five, and six.

My goal for last week was to get my eBook Twelve Easy Daily Emotional Fitness Exercises edited and ready to publish as an EFTI PDF eBook.  Didn’t happen.  But my motivation remains high enough to succeed,  and I will attempt to meet last week’s goal by Friday of this week.

Have you been following my SMART Goal setting series. If not, you might want to skip ahead and read from the beginning. If so, skip down to the links section at the bottom of this post. Otherwise, read on.

When you do not meet a daily or weekly goal, you need to figure out why not and then set a strategy for moving on or changing your goal.

I almost made this week’s goal. I made it a top priority, stopped blogging daily, spent less time on social media, stopped lots of other things. What happened then? Two things.

First, I got bit by perfectionism. Instead of proof-reading and just correcting the errors doing so revealed, I got into copy editing and rewriting. I made some major revisions and I am pleased with them.

I revised the title and then had to spend some time aligning the content to match the title. I think that was worth it as  I think the revised title  might sell better than the old one. The new one:

The new one:  Cross-train Your Brain and Strengthen Your Emotional Intelligence with the subtitle: Practice These Easy Emotional Fitness Exercises.  Do you agree it might have more sales appeal?

The second barrier to success was my commitment to another goal. That goal?  Balancing my life better.  Which means not stressing so much when family and friends called. This week one of the grandchildren was sick; he needed to be with us instead of at daycare. We had a wonderful time together, but no work happened on my EFTI goal.

Today, I have a social date with my husband to go to a Learn at Lunch Torah class. I almost gave that up but decided our date  was more important, particularly as we missed going when our caring for our sick grandson.

However, I need to get that eBook out. So I  had to review my goal, my motivation and set a strategy for this week. This week’s goal: To week at the same pace but concentrating on proofreading only, then making the cover, then publishing the book by Friday.

CRITICAL THINKING EXERCISE

WordPress Daily Prompt Key  Takeaway

Give your newer sisters and brothers-in-WordPress one piece of advice based on your experiences blogging. 

My advice: Obvious.  Set a SMART goal. Takes time, but makes all the difference in whether you will feel successful and have the energy to keep going.

PRACTICE KINDNESS

Thank you for all you do.  Thank me by remembering sharing is caring; so is liking, or commenting. Your caring keeps me going.

Katherine

LINKS TO THE SMART GOAL SERIES

LINKS OF INTEREST

These links are for those not familiar with Emotional Intelligence or the idea of Emotional Fitness.

Easy Emotional Fitness Exercises (www.emotionalfitnesstraining.com
The five components of Emotional Intelligence (www.sonoma.edu)Emotional Intelligence (en.wikipedia.org)Emotional Fitness Tips for Parents  (parentsarepeopletoo.com)
An Emotional Fitness Program for Parents(amazon.com)

2 Comments

  1. I like your lessons learned and will add one. This has to do with competing goals. Such as your book and time with family. Stress occurs when we feel we do not have enough resources to meet demands. What is very important in reviewing the competing goals is the appraisal we make. If in this case had you appraised that time with family is a hindrance to your writing goal or vice versa, it would have sapped your energy and further depleted your emotional coping resources. If, however, as you did, make a clear appraisal and see it as a challenge to take care of the family, and do what you can on the book, you will have more energy. You will feel less stressed as you have more energy to meet your demands. You will do more. So always ask yourself – do I see this demand as a hindrance to my goals or a challenge?

    Dr. Roger LaVine

    • Great point. Part setting my SMART goal did a bit of this. I am thinking another strategy would be to at some point set a SMART goal for quality of life. Not motivated to do that, but certainly belongs in my Mission and Goals book. Thank you for sparking this thought.

      Katherine

Agree or disagree, comments are always welcomed.